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Why I Race: Health Hope Happiness

By Cory Boddy:

There are a lot of reasons to race, whatever your discipline. Over the years I’ve focused on mountain biking, then switched to running, then mixed it up with duathlon, and now I’m pretty into road cycling and cyclocross. The disciplines have changed, but my reasons for racing haven’t. I like the challenge, I like to see improvement, it keeps my head clear and my heart healthy, and I like social aspect of cycling. There is something else though; a bonus, an added motivation that comes from being part of Fiera Race Club.

Whatever race I compete in, my race entry fees are matched with an equal charitable donation from our sponsor, Fiera Biological Consulting, to the club-supported charity of my choice. My choice is always Camp He Ho Ha.

Camp He Ho Ha or more proper: Health, Hope, and Happiness is a local camp near Edmonton, for people with special needs. Every summer over 800 campers attend, some as young as 7 and others as old as 90.

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One of the best summers of my life was spent at Camp He Ho Ha. I was a Camp Counselor and for four months 800 campers with disabilities brightened every moment. I’ll never forget that summer and I try to use that experience to steer the decisions I make some 20 years later. That’s why I continue to support Camp He Ho Ha and why I’m thrilled to be part of a race club that allows me to give even more.

We are truly fortunate to be able to race, train, and ride with a club that makes this possible.

Since joining Fiera Race Team, I have participated in enough races to see Fiera Biological donate  $1,800 to Camp He Ho Ha! These are donations that are direly needed, and appreciated, and all I had to do was something that I already enjoyed, and fill out a simple online form after each race. That’s it. I didn’t have to win, or do well… or even finish, come to think of it. I just had to do what I’m already passionate about doing … get outdoors and challenge myself.

So as the race season sets upon us, I hope the rest of my Fiera Race Club teammates will challenge themselves to race and remember to report their race achievements to secure a donation to Camp He Ho Ha or any of the other worthy charities we have chosen to support. There are plenty of reasons to get out there and race. This just happens to be one of the better ones.

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Since the club began, the racing adventrures of our membership have generated nearly $10,000! Below is a list of the awesome charities supported by Fiera Race Team as a result of our racing efforts. To report your results, just look to left side-margin of this homepage where it says Recent Results, then click “tell us about it!

Right to Play

Doctors Without Boarders

Nature Conservancy of Canada

The Canadian Red Cross

Food Banks Canada

Camp He-Ho-Ha

Stollery Children’s Hospital

Environmental Law Centre

 

 

 

 

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Race Report: Hypothermic Half Marathon – Edmonton

By Renee Howard

After being gently prodded by Joe (and by gently, I mean relentlessly over the last two weeks), I’m finally ready to recap and thus relive my first Half Marathon.

Back in early October, I decided to run the Hypothermic Half Marathon. Since registering for the race, I’ve had a number of people ask me “Why would you want to run a half marathon?” This is very quickly followed up by “Why would you want to run a half marathon in the winter?!” To be completely honest, I asked these same questions to myself nearly every Sunday morning, at 8 am while just about to start a long run…

In reality, training for this race wasn’t terrible. I would hazard a guess that this year was, for the most part, the best that winter running conditions could get in Edmonton. The majority of my training runs were done in temperatures between -10°C and 5°C, I never once wore grips on my shoes, and only a handful of times did I have more than three layers on my upper body! In the fall, I knew that the projections for winter 2015/2016 were for a mild winter with less snow than usual. So I took advantage of this and tried my hand at winter running!

It’s funny because I’m supposed to be writing a race report, but after 17 weeks of training most of what I want to share are things I’ve learned, funny moments, or weird winter running quirks that I’ve picked up since starting my training back in October. So much so, that I would have to say that running the race was the easy part! There are lots of things I could say about winter running, but I’ll stick to my given task, and write a race report.

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I like the Hypothermic Half Marathon race because the proceeds benefit Nature Alberta. The cause is important to me and I’ve volunteered as a course marshal a couple of times so I knew this was the race I wanted to do. Though the course isn’t much to write home about (two loops along Ada boulevard starting and finishing at the Highlands Golf Course), the reason most other people run the race is for the breakfast! This was apparent from the very beginning when the announcer’s pep talk mostly comprised talk about how good the bacon would be at the end, also very early into the race when the people I was running with were counting down the minutes until they could get bacon, and again at right around the 15 km point when I passed a group of runners chanting bacon, bacon, bacon to match their steps. As a vegetarian, the bacon wasn’t really doing it to keep me going, but I knew there would be breakfast potatoes available so that was enough for me!

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The looped course, though not very scenic, was actually very motivating to run! I passed other members of my training group multiple times on the course, I high-fived my much faster friend as she flew by me twice, and I was able to run past my spectators four times. Plus, there’s nothing like a group of race marshalls watching at the corner, cheering you on to keep you running when you really want a walk break (thanks Tonya ;)). Overall, it was a really good first half marathon race!

While I didn’t beat my Goal A of under 2:30, I did achieve my Goal B of finishing upright and smiling. I’m already planning for my next race, knowing I will train a bit differently to surpass Goal A next time. My struggle now will be integrating cycling into this summer’s training schedule to be able to keep up with the rest of the Fiera Race Team. See you all on the trails! Results are here!

12733422_10153225436710807_970726274870943921_nPhoto of my fast friend, Katie, and I (2484) taken minutes after I crossed the finish line. Also a great photo of the on-site facilities…

 

Race Report: Fernie 3 all mountain stage race

By Duncan Purvis

A couple of friends and I decided that this year we would head to Fernie for the Fernie 3 All Mountain Stage Race. This is one of those decisions that sounds better in February than it does trying to drag oneself out of bed on the third day of the “race” (by “race”, I mean ride). The Fernie 3 was held on June 27, 28 and 29th. Since I signed up I think I was worried most about whether or not it would rain while we were there, which often happens in Fernie. What I did not worry about was record high temperatures in the +35 range. It hit 36 on Saturday, 37 on Sunday and “only” 30 on Monday.
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Day 1

The first stage was a 28 km course with 1,300 metres of vertical. The start was a new subdivision just off the highway on the way to the ski hill. When we arrived at 8:45 for the briefing, it was already in the mid 20’s. The race (ride) started at 9:30 on a beautiful, newly paved road. For the first 5 minutes of my day I quite enjoyed myself.

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The course quickly veered off to a fire road that I can only describe as being covered in about 3 inches of finely powdered dirt. 150 mountain bikers churning up the silt turned it very dusty, very quickly. As I was not winning the race (ride) at that point, I was behind a number of other dirt churning machines so as if the heat wasn’t enough, a few mouthfuls of dirt really added to ambience. After about 10 minutes in the dustbowl, the course mercifully veered off into some single track. For about 30 seconds, I was again somewhat happy. Then the trail started going up. Then it went up some more. Then a bit more. Then a few seconds of rooted, rocky downhill and then up again. I think there might have been an aid station and some watermelon. Then up, and up and up some more. At one point the climb broke out of the trees into the baking sun. I think I was suffering a little bit from the heat. (as well as suffering from the fact I had not mountain biked in the actual mountains since June of 2014). There was some point in time that I had just decided I was never going to be cold ever again in my life. That I had absorbed and created so much heat that I was just going to exude warmth for the next 40 years. Mercifully, my thoughts kept my mind from the pain my legs were suffering from, and after a few grueling hours I had reached peak elevation.

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Nothing like a mountain bike race to get your fill of that clean mountain air! Breath deeply.

I thought to myself that I had made it. Just a nice downhill, and I could cruise across the finish line and drink some more . I was wrong. The next 20 minutes was a hair raising (if I had any) descent. Chock full of steep drops, roots, rocks and trees it was almost harder than the uphill. No rest for the arms, or braking fingers, my upper body was sore by the time I finished. So while it was a relief to hit level ground, it lasted about a minute because the course sent us back up a hill again. I think there might have been an aid station and some watermelon.I thought to myself that I had made it. Just a nice downhill, and I could cruise across the finish line and drink some more Slingshot IPA from FBC. I was wrong. The next 20 minutes was a hair raising (if I had any) descent. Chock full of steep drops, roots, rocks and trees it was almost harder than the uphill. No rest for the arms, or braking fingers, my upper body was sore by the time I finished. So while it was a relief to hit level ground, it lasted about a minute because the course sent us back up a hill again. I think there might have been an aid station and some watermelon.

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Aid stations are crucial on hot race days, and here the author is captured by his own bike cam elbowing his way to the beer keg for some much needed mid race refreshment.

This time, the climb took us up some singletrack to meet up with a fire road that came out of the trees at the bottom of the cedar bowl at the ski hill. By now it was about 12:30. It was hotter than it was when we came out of the trees the last time. I cursed the fast riders who were probably done by now and drinking all the cold beer. I again contemplated my fate as the human furnace. I finally came around the corner of the climb and saw the trail disappear into the darkness of the trees (Shade!), a fittingly named downhill called “Dark Forest”. While it was somewhat cooler in the trees, this trail was another steep downhill in soft black dirt that I can only assume came from the burning fires of Mordor. Or perhaps I was in a heat induced hallucination. I really was suffering from the heat. A bit dizzy… I remember thinking that I was probably a bit of a danger to any other riders around me, but luckily I remembered everyone was probably already finished by now and they had likely packed up and gone home. I was only a danger to myself. Only a small spill in sooty black soot of the dark forest, and I was back out on “powdered dust road”, headed for the finish. That’s when the muscles in my right quad seized up in a gnarled spasm. Sigh. A few stops to stretch it out and I was back on the glorious new asphalt, headed for the finish.

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Shade, thank Shimano! Welcome to the Dark Forest!

If I’ve had a harder day on the mountain bike I’d have to think back to day 3 of the transrockies where I had walk most of the way up Cox hill in the pouring rain. But hey, at least that day I was cool. Of course Im referring to the “temperature” sense, as I never, ever feel like I’m “cool” in the I’m awesome sense, in a race like this.

Obviously, my greatest fear was that the free keg of beer donated by the FBC at the finish was gone, or worse yet, warm. Happily there was some nice cold stuff still left when I got there.slingshot_with_glass_small

Day 2

You know that feeling when your friend books the accommodation (for 3 people) and it turns out to NOT be three bedrooms, but two bedrooms and one crappy short leather couch on the top floor of an non-air conditioned apartment complex that was built as close to the railroad tracks as any building code would possibly allow?

I wouldn’t call “sleep” what I did that night. More like a series of short naps in a sauna with a train.

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Planes Trains and Automobiles….. and mountain bikes.

Just to make sure my worst fears from the day before did not come true, I decided to make sure I had my free beer BEFORE the race started, and before those fast guys got it. I showed them. Hiccup.

Day 2 was a 32 km course with 1225 of vertical. After the horror show of the day before, this day was almost pleasant. Maybe it was the pre race beers. Or maybe I had recognized that I needed some electrolytes in my water to stave off any leg crampsIt started out in town with a km or so of pavement. The group hit the trail, but thankfully it wasn’t as dusty. As usual, it just went up and up. I think the first climb was about 500 m over 5 km. I kept telling myself it was just like all the hills in the River Valley back in Edmonton. The corresponding first downhill was a really nice piece of trail nice flowing, fast turns and not too steep. This downhill led into a nice section of smaller up hills and smaller down hills, faster sections of up down, versus big climbs and big descents. It was fun…

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That way?!!? Are you serious? According to my GPS the beer is just over there! What’s your volunteer badge number? I am going to need to speak to your manager!

As the course turned and started heading back into town, my garmin was reading about 30 km. the single track gave way to a gravel path which appeared to me to lead us straight back to the finish line. I felt good. I forgot that apparently this weekend was about suffering, so it shouldn’t have been a surprise when I came around a corner and instead of course markings pointing straight down the gravel path to the beer, they pointed up a steep hill into the trees. I thought about stopping and arguing with the course marshall that my garmin said I had gone 32 km, and that’s what the course was supposed to be, but if I was honest with myself, I did demonstrate some willfull blindness as the elevation gain was on my garmin was only reading about 1000 m. Cursing the organizers I headed up the hill. Maybe it was the power of negative thinking, but my leg cramps came back again despite my electrolyte precautions. Another few breaks with precious seconds between me and cold beer ticking away, I eventually hit the top. Again, not sure if it was my bad attitude but I managed to slide out on the gravel road going down the hill. Just to add a little road rash to my hip in case I was feeling too good about myself. Finally, the finish line came into view some 35 (an extra 3!!) km into the day.

Day 3

Train,Sauna, sticky leather couch etc. And honestly, if all that wasn’t bad enough, the building fire alarm decided that it needed to go off at 3 am. I was merrily sleeping right through it before one of my friends woke me up to tell me they were going downstairs until the fire dept. came. I told him I felt safe in my bed and to text me if there actually was a fire. I tried to go back to sleep but the fireman came barging in to the apartment looking for the fire. He didnt find it, and he also didnt tell me to get out, so I went back to bed.7GoJtUzaA0UrXOh9utQKqJUmnyR

We awoke, (or were still awake) for day three to some overcast skies! It only hit 31 that day. This day was a 30 km course with about 1100 meters of climbing. We rode a lot of the trails we did on day 2, but in reverse direction. They were fun, but served to simply show me that anything I was going fast on the day before was in fact a net downhill. Another excellent blow to the ego. On the plus side, there were some times when I was actually pushing it, as opposed to just surviving. felt good enough to try and chase some people as opposed to hating the world and everything in it. For brief moments it was “race” not a “ride”.

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I finished, no significant injuries or bike damage. Day 1 gets more and more enjoyable in my memory, the further back in time it goes. We stuck around for the banquet on Monday night and sure enough, the FBC had some more cold beer.  All in all, fun weekend. Already thinking about registering for next year! Have to say I was impressed with Fernie and the number of trails they have. Its obvious they have done a lot of work on trail maintenance and have built the requisite structures to ensure smooth riding. Obviously they need to work on filling the valley floor or shaving the tops off the mountains so their climbs are more like the Edmonton River Valley, but I’ll give them some time for that.
In summary, Fernie Brewing Company makes good beer.

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A lot of work has gone into the trail system at Fernie. Features like this boardwalk are not uncommon, and super fun.

Race Report: Coronation Triathlon – by Duncan Purvis

After a 2 year hiatus from Coronation, I decided to give it a whirl again in 2015. It was an absolutely gorgeous day for a race, if just a little warm. The race is now being run by Multisport Canada, which has a signifcant amount of experience putting on running and tri races. While generally, the organization was good, and the volunteers excellent, their handling of body marking and swim organization left something to be desired. In years past, organizers had an excellent system for placing swimmers in the appropriate lanes, with the similar paced athletes. The organizers have shifted to a system of “waves” whereby athletes were sorted into approximate swim times. Unfortunately, these waves were very large, and had a fairly significant time differential. Based on my estimated swim time of 20:00, I was placed into wave 4, along with 125 other athletes with an estimated swim time of 19-22 minutes. There was no further sorting or fine tuning after that. Communication about start time was also lacking, in my opinion. I lined up amongst the rest of the 4th wavers and hoped for the best.

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Giving the Coronation Triathlon another go in 2015

 

I was a bit uncertain about the swim this year. Given the proximity to work, I had been doing most of my swim training at the YMCA downtown, which has a 25 m pool. It was only a few weeks ago that I went down to the Kinsmen one night for a swim, and I realized that training in a 25 m pool is quite a bit different from training in a 50 m pool, which I had always done previously. I found my times drop a bit so wasnt sure how the race would pan out, given the Peter Hemingway Pool is 50 m. I managed the 1k in about 19:40, a bit off my best for Coronation. I will point out, as I have in years past, tight, crowded pool swims in triathlons do not lend themselves to making friends of the other swimmmers. That’s all I am going to say about that.

It was a little before 10 when I got out of the pool, so not too hot, but I could feel that in an hour or so, it was going to be a scorcher. Given a last lap surge to try and make a pass in the pool, I was quite a bit more out of breath than I would have liked coming out of the pool.

No T1 issues and I was off on the bike! My training this year included very little time on my TT bike, but it felt great! I keep telling people this, but the ability to bomb down Groat Road on new pavement, with no cars on the road is worth the entry fee alone. Luckily, I wasn’t hit by any bent, falling girders. In 2012, the last time I did this race, I had my best bike leg ever. It was one of my goals to beat that time this year. I had planned my splits and the approximate pace I’d need to meet that so I was working pretty hard on the uphills. Each lap as I neared the top of Groat, I would tell myself that I really should coast a bit on the downhill, rest, and get my HR down some. But every time I’d start down the hill I couldn’t resist gearing up and continuing to crank down the hill. Then I’d go through the same thought process near the top of the hill. It was like some Triathlon version of groundhog day, without Sonny and Cher, and the funny. Seemed to have worked though, as I ended beating my 2012 bike time by almost 2 minutes.

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Bike Course

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Some basic Strava statistics

 

Back to T2 and I was off on the run. By now it was getting pretty warm, and I could just not calm my HR down. There was apparently a price that was a going to be paid for going hard on the bike. Running is really not my strong point, so I never expect too much. I know from years past that the key is to make time while you can on the downhill section of Groat, because coming back up as the last thing you do in the race, will never gain you much time. I started off moderately, but gradually built up the pace and before I knew it, I was at the turnaround. I won’t lie, it was a tough slog back up, and I was suffering. Dead legs, a HR that just kept going up and up, overheated, upset stomach… you name it! About 20 painful minutes later, I was rounding the bend near the pool to head back to the finish. No word of a lie, I swear they moved that corner further down the road. Bastards.

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Running pace heart rate splits.

 

All in all, a great race. Even swim, faster bike, slower run (they moved the corner!!!) led to within about a minute of my previous best overall time. What satisfied me most about this race was the run though. I pushed through a lot to keep running and try to keep my goal pace. I’m a bit of a Strava geek, and when I got home and checked things out the numbers confirmed what my body felt…basically i spent 96% of the race in HR zone 4 or 5. Strava also has a feature called “suffer score” which takes some formula based on activity time and HR (as far as I can tell) and give you a number. I was “pleased” that this turned out to be my highest number ever, so some somewhat objective confirmation of exactly how crappy I felt. I just re-read that. Essentially, what I think I just said is that I felt like absolute crap on a run for 43 minutes, but I’m happy because I felt like crap, and furthermore, an electronic measurement of a bodily function transferred via blue tooth to a wrist computer, and then ultimately transferred to another computer to input on a website, confirms that I felt like crap, therefore increasing my happiness. Weird times my friends, weird times.

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EXTREME suffer Score! Proof that it hurt, incase the pain wasn’t proof enough.

 

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Celebrating a successful triathlon effort with the whole family

 

Race Report: Einstein Triathlon in Ulm, Germany

By Lenka Plavcova

Last weekend Jan and I took part in the Einstein Triathlon in Ulm, Germany. It was the grand premiere of the sport of triathlon in Ulm and the organizers promised a great race of magnificent proportions. There were 3 different distances (Sprint, Olympic, Half-Iron) to choose from. The highlights of the course included a swim in the Danube (downstream), a challenging bike course with 14% and 16% grade hills and a flat run course winding through the historic center of Ulm. We decided to sign up for the race in May. At that point, the sprint distance was already sold out, so I opted for the Olympic, whereas Jan chose the less dynamic Half-ironman distance.

Since we left Canada, we slipped out of the influence of crazy sport geeks from the UofA Tri Club and Fiera and lost our weekly triathlon routine. Actually, some of those geeks surprised us in Europe and we got some good training hours with Mike and Emily and we suffered in the X-trail marathon with Dave and Bridget http://roder-blog.blogspot.de/2013/06/v-behaviorurldefaultvmlo.html. Anyway, our training for the race consisted mostly of running. Besides that, I bike to work almost every day. The commute is about 10 km long (one way) and includes 2 km uphill with 150 m elevation gain, so it is a quite good morning workout for me. I largely neglected swimming – my favorite part of the triathlon (blink blink). Since we returned back to Europe last September, I went to the pool twice I guess. In early June, the race organizers put on a test swim in the Danube. I was glad to finally try out my wetsuit that Jan won as a door prize in Canada and that I didn’t have a chance to use during the ITU Triathlon in Edmonton because water in the Hawrelak Lake was too hot. Water being too hot wasn’t really an issue in the Danube in June as the temperature during the test swim was only 15°C. I blamed the cold temperature for not allowing me to submerge my face in water and swim freestyle.  So the test swim was very informative, telling me that I should practice cold water hardening and perhaps even swim more often than twice a year. Having learned this, I went open water swimming 3 more times in July. The good news was that I could swim freestyle in open water; however, all those swims were rather short.

With the race day approaching, things changed slightly. Because of the dry and hot summer this year, the river temperature rose to unusually warm 21°C so I didn’t need to worry about the cold hardiness any more. Instead, I started worrying they will ban wetsuits. The day before the race we learnt that the wetsuits would be still allowed (good news). However, the organizers also confessed that the swim would be longer than the indicated official distance (bad news). When preparing the race, they decided to account for the river current and extended the swim course by a factor proportional to the typical flow rate. But because of the drought, the Danube discharge was now extremely low, providing almost no advantage to a swimmer. Oh well, bad luck…

A sweet thing about this triathlon was that it started late and directly in the middle of our home town. Jan’s race started at 9:45 and mine at 11:30, so we didn’t need to get up crazily early. I went with Jan to the start line to cheer him on and also to see the main star of the race – a former ITU Triathlon world champion Daniel Unger who was competing with Jan in the Half-ironman race. Unger was actually the big teaser for the race as there was a 5,000€ prize awarded to those who beat him. I watched the start and then walked along the river towards my starting spot just 1 km downstream. I still had plenty of time so I sat down at the river bank and waited. The time passed quickly and shortly I was standing in my wetsuit on the pontoon. We were given enough time to jump in and test the water, which I appreciated. The race went off and I started with my excellent freestyle technique. The first 20 meters went fine, I enjoyed the bubbling water around me, but then people started to cross in front of me and bump into me which I found annoying. I had to constantly look up and started to run out of breath, so I switched to breaststroke. I tried to switch back to freestyle again but I could not get into a comfortable rhythm, so I finally gave up and continued with the breaststroke. 20 min into the swim I started to feel tired and gave freestyle one more try. However, when I realized that I was swimming into the bushes rather than straight ahead, I surrendered again. The swim started to feel really long and I was looking forward to seeing the exiting pontoon. To my great relief, that happened after long 47 minutes. As I was exiting the water, my head was spinning and my legs were cramping. I guess I used mainly the legs to power me through the water. I toddled into the transition zone and grabbed my bag. There was a line of chairs to sit on while taking the wetsuit off, which I gladly accepted and sat there for a little while.

Lenka, making sure she still had a pulse after completing the swim.

Lenka, making sure she still had a pulse after completing the swim.

I put on my Fiera jersey and ate some gummi bears that I had in the pocket. I started to feel better so I ran for my bike and out of the transition area. I mounted on and quickly headed out on the bike course.

The course started with a 12km-long flat section, followed by a rather short but steep hill. The organizers set up a prime there to spice the race up. I felt pretty well on the flat part and climbing the hill was not so bad either. The course then went over some rolling hills in the middle of fields. Uh, did I mention that it was 35°C and burning sun that day? It felt pretty hot so I made sure to drink enough water. I also started to wonder if I should perhaps eat something. I reached for an energy bar and started to chew on it bite by bite. I don’t like eating while moving. Even when I buy an ice cream on a normal day I prefer to sit down or at least to stop while eating it, so gulping down the energy bar was not a big pleasure, but soon I could feel the new energy in my body. I knew that one big hill is still waiting for me at the kilometer 35, so I decided to have a gel. It was the first energy gel I ever ate and I can tell you it won’t become my favorite treat (yes, I know you’re not supposed to try out new things during the race but I have an adventurous spirit). Maybe thanks to the gel, climbing the 18% grade hill was not that hard. I even overpassed two riders there which was an occasion that didn’t occur during the entire ride so far. The last stretch of the bike course was a nice long descent towards the stadium. Overall, I really enjoyed the bike part. The course was interesting and diverse and closed for traffic which was really sweet. In contrast to my swim experience, the bike felt nice and easy.

Lenka, looking good in her Fiera Jersey, and comfortable on the bike. Photo credit to a roadside gofer.

Lenka, looking good in her Fiera Jersey, and comfortable on the bike despite having to detour off pavement through a section of African savannah! 

Bike to run transition went smooth. It was really nice to run on tartan through the track and field stadium. The first kilometer of the course was shaded by trees. I met Jan heading in the opposite direction and waved at him. I was running 5:26 min per kilometer pace and was passing people. However, then I hit the sunlit pavement and started to feel overheated. I had to stop in the aid-station at 2.5km to have a drink. I continued running at a pace of around 6 min/km but felt pretty awful so I stopped occasionally in the shade to cool off. It was too hot. There were a couple of sprinklers set up on the course, which was awesome but didn’t help for long. Thanks God for the aid stations! I had Gatorade and water at every 2km and was wondering if I should also eat something but my stomach didn’t feel so happy about this idea and was cramping every now and then. I kept running and was very happy to see the mark for the last 3km. Shortly after Jan passed me from the back and asked how I feel. I said that I feel awful and that he should run ahead. So he ran and I ran too, just a little bit slower. I skipped my obligatory rest and drink at the last aid station and ran into the stadium for the final stretch on the oval track. Hooray! After 3 hours and 37 minutes finally crossing the finish line!

Lenka, finishing her first Olympic distance triathlon! Congratulations.

Lenka, finishing her first Olympic distance triathlon! Congratulations.

To sum it all up, the race was a great experience. The organizers did a great job in all respects. I was particularly impressed how promptly they responded to the unusual heat wave and reinforced the aid stations and cooling possibilities along the course. This race was the first Olympic triathlon race I’ve ever done if I don’t count our family triathlon last September that admittedly is a bit less professional and less competitive. It was definitely the longest and hardest race I’ve done so far. So here is my take on it:

Swim: I was a bit disappointed that I wasn’t able to swim freestyle during the race. I learnt how to swim freestyle just 4 years ago thanks to the awesome swim coaches from the UofA Tri club and my technique has been improving since then. I’m able to swim 750m freestyle in a pool and I’m still secretly hoping that a day will come when I complete a race swimming freestyle in open water. Sadly, it didn’t happen in this race. Maybe I need to practice more, or maybe I just need more mental toughness to get over the initial discomfort.  My only excuse for the 47 minute swim is that it was not 1.5km but almost 2.5 km according to Google maps.

Bike: When I looked at the results, I realized that feeling great and relaxed on the bike might not have been such a positive thing. I didn’t have a bike computer and I wasn’t monitoring my speed during the race but I was hoping my bike split would be better than 1 hour 37 minutes. I don’t think it was the uphills where I sucked the most. I suspect I was losing mainly on the flats and downhills. Next time, I should try to wake up my inner ‘fiera’ and ride more aggressively pushing a bigger gear. Learning how to ride with aero bars might also be helpful.

Run: I finished the 10km course in 1 hour and 4 minutes which corresponds to a pace of 6:24min/km. This is definitely not a great split and I can run faster than that. I’m not really sure if it was the heat that killed me or if I was too tired from the previous disciplines. Result-wise, the run was still my best discipline and I managed to move up in the result list to a nice 72nd spot out of 86 women.

Also, here are some details about Jan’s race: The only training Jan did was that he bought a Tri suite a week before the race. He struggled on the swim, although a bit more successfully than me. On the bike, Jan focused on getting the hill prime. He started his mad climb! The crowds went nuts! However, 50 m before the line he ran out of gas and had to slow down. In spite of this, he had the 19th fastest time (out of 861 contestants) and even beat the world champion Unger by one second. Unfortunately, this heroic effort wore out not only Jan but also his bike and a couple of kilometers later he had a flat. He managed to fix it but knew that his race today will not be the fastest. With these thoughts, he went into the run. He ran nice and easy, not on the edge of collapse as he usually does. So in summary, Jan had fun out there and the final time of 5 hours 15 minutes was not a disappointment for him.

Jan showing off his tri-suit!

Jan showing off his tri-suit after having a quick road-side shower.

Always eating! Better safe some sausage for the run!

Cheers!

The results are here: https://www.abavent.de/anmeldeservice/einsteintriathlon2013/ergebnisse

And finally I want to take the time to congratulate Joe on making the cover of Alberta Outdoorsman!

In case you did not know, Jan doesn't just eat sausages and race triathlons, he is also a photoshop genius!

In case you did not know, Jan doesn’t just eat sausages and race triathlons, he is also a photoshop genius!

 

Group Ride

Had an awesome group ride last night with the off road cycling crew, Derek, Duncan, Jan and myself. We hit some of the most challenging singletrack city, and after some thrills and spills, we ended up sitting on a patio with some pills. Great riding and pretty ok company. If you have a mountain bike, then you really ought to come out and treat yourself to a Thursday Night Fiera MTB group ride. All the cool kids are doing it!

Calgary Police Half Marathon

So, I tried to find some info on the race that Josh is doing this weekend in Calgary, and it seems there isn’t a whole lot to know. It’s a half marathon (that’s a distance only the abrupt onset of the apocalypse could entice me to attempt) that was first put on something like 30 years ago by a couple of cops. It’s been going strong ever since. Josh will be representing Fiera Race Team, and generating money for the good of society as he does it. Josh does everything full-on (including the hiccups), and I’m sure he will put in an impressive effort and achieve a respectable result at the race. Good luck Josh, can’t wait for the report.

Race Report: ERTC pre-season road race

Congratulations to Jan Palvec who ventured out for his first road race last weekend.  While the rest of us were hiding indoors from the blustery winds and chilly temperatures, Jan was out on the road representing the Fiera Race Team in the “C” category of ERTC’s pre-season road race.

I had a beer with Jan last night and hung on to every word as he modestly recounted each lap of glorious glory.

Since it was his first road race ever, Jan was content to sit near the back of the peloton and study his competition, biding his time, marveling at the energy costs he experienced when he slipped out of the protection of the peloton.  Soon he was certain he knew who the fastest riders in the group were, but he marveled at how relaxed the group rode, at speeds far short of what he felt he could sustain for a 50 km race.

Still, wisely, he held back, only moving to the front group in the final few kilometers. Then, finally he could contain himself no longer, and he put his legs to work driving for the finish in the final kilometer. He shattered the peloton, striking a pace that only three others could match.  With all his strength he tried to pull away from his three perusers, but they clung to his rear wheel like snot to my cyclocross glove.  Then, with 60 meters to go, Jan felt what countless Tour de France riders have felt in the final 60 meters of a stage, his worthy competitors launch from the shelter of his rear wheel and take for themselves, his podium.

And so, our novice hero takes 4th place in his first road race ever, setting the stage for what promises to be a very exciting season of racing for the Fiera Race Team.  As a result of Jan’s efforts, one of our worthy charities will receive a donation no less than Jan’s race entry fees.